This week, we explore the one job skill Americans lack most (nope, not programming), the secret to giving empathetic criticism, tips on talent analytics, and the five books top HR leaders think you need to read.

What Job Skill Is Most Lacking In The U.S. According to LinkedIn’s CEO?

INC

According to LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner, this skill is “essential” to account management, sales, and project management – really, any role. If someone doesn’t have it, we all notice. And the worst part? If we’re bad at it, we often don’t even realize it. Give up? It’s communication. If your team lacks it, here’s what you can do.

This is My Secret to Giving Empathetic Criticism as a New Manager

Fast Company

Angel investor and former President of Digital at Time Inc. Fran Hauser used to hate giving feedback. She was paralyzed by it. Yet in her first managerial role, at 27, she hit a breaking point. After pulling all-nighters to clean up her employees’ errors, she realized that she couldn’t always be the good cop. To succeed, she’d need to criticize.

HR Leaders from Netflix and Pinterest Think You Should Read These Books

Fast Company

According to Netflix’s former Chief Talent Officer Patty McCord, running a world-class organization is pretty straightforward: “It’s almost always about putting together incredible teams that do amazing work on time.” But how is that actually done? Where are those people? In this article, HR leaders like Patty suggest the five books that hold the answer.

Tips on People Analytics from Pfizer’s Head of Talent Analytics

Jacob Morgan

How do you get more data-driven about talent management? Pfizer’s Head of Talent Analytics Arun Chidambaram has some ideas. For example, be patient. Work across business units. And if the company is large enough, consider giving analytics its own department.

That’s a recap wrap! If your organization could use better communication skills, well, that’s why there’s BetterWorks. Try it out with your team.

If you’re just tuning in, here’s last week’s recap: Talent Famines, Biases, and a 132% Leadership Boost